;

Take the first step towards recovery

(870) 515-4356

How to Identify OxyContin

by Ginni Correa |  ❘ 

What is OxyContin?

OxyContin is the brand name for oxycodone hydrochloride, a prescription opioid used to treat moderate to severe pain. Unfortunately, individuals of all ages currently abuse OxyContin and those who take it as prescribed risk becoming dependent on the drug. OxyContin can be easy to identify because it is a brand name rather than a generic drug, often featuring an imprint on each individual tablet. Other names for OxyContin include:

  • Oxy
  • OxyCotton
  • Oxy 80 (in reference to the 80mg dose)
  • OC
  • Blue
  • Kicker
  • Hillbilly heroin

How to Identify OxyContin

OxyContin is only available through prescription and should never be taken by someone who has not been prescribed by a healthcare professional. You can usually identify OxyContin by reading the label on the prescription bottle, as it uses the brand name. OxyContin is bottled and labeled either OxyContin or Oxycodone Hydrochloride. It is important to always read the label before taking any prescription drugs.

What Does OxyContin Look Like?

OxyContin is most commonly prescribed as a tablet. This prescription opioid is available in 10mg, 20mg, 40mg, 80mg, and 160mg doses. You can usually identify OxyContin by the imprint featured on the pills. The tablets are usually round but vary in color and size according to dosage. Tablets are imprinted with the letters OC or OP on one side and the number of milligrams on the opposite side.

OxyContin tablets are designed to be swallowed whole due to their controlled-release feature. When this drug is abused, users will often crush it in order to bypass the controlled-release factor, allowing a quick and intense effect. It can be difficult to identify OxyContin once it’s been crushed to be snorted or dissolved in water and injected. This practice is dangerous and can lead to overdosing on OxyContin’s active ingredient, oxycodone. Although not as common, OxyContin may also come in capsule or liquid form.

For more information on OxyContin addiction and treatment, contact a treatment provider today.

Published:

Author

Ginni Correa

Photo of Ginni Correa
  • Ginni Correa is a Latinx writer and activist living in Orlando,FL. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Florida and double majored in Psychology and Spanish with a minor in Latin American Studies. After graduation, Ginni worked as an educator in public schools and an art therapist in a behavioral health hospital where she found a passion working with at-risk populations and advocating for social justice and equality. She is also experienced in translating and interpreting with an emphasis in language justice and creating multilingual spaces. Ginni’s mission is to build awareness and promote resources that can help people transform their lives. She believes in the importance of ending stigma surrounding mental health and substance abuse while creating more accessible treatment in communities. In her spare time, she enjoys reading, crafting, and attending music festivals.

  • More from Ginni Correa

Sources