Different Drugs Stay In Your System For Different Amounts Of Time

The lengths of the effects of different drugs vary greatly. For example, the high from LSD lasts 6 to 12 hours, but the high from Cocaine lasts about 15-30 minutes. The same is true for how long a drug stays in the body’s systems, even after the effect has worn off. Some drugs will stay in your system for days; some months. How long a drug is detectable depends on a number of factors.

There are a variety of reasons that a drug test might need to be conducted such as probation, legal cases, custody, divorce, employee testing, and court-ordered testing. Additionally, many sporting officials require urine drug screens to check whether athletes have used performance-enhancing drugs.

There are different types of drug tests that are used depending on the goal of the test. These include urine, saliva, blood, hair, and perspiration. Urine testing is the most common because of its ease, affordability, and fast results. It is also the only testing method approved for federally-mandated testing. Urine testing can detect if a substance has been used in the past few days for most drugs.

Hair drug testing is very effective and almost impossible to cheat at, as the hair follicle from a person’s head is taken and sent to a laboratory to be tested. It can tell if someone has used most drugs for a significantly longer period, sometimes up to the past 90 days. Hair testing is also the most efficient for the purpose of detecting on-going or repetitive drug use, because if a person only uses a drug once, they are less likely to show up as positive on a hair test. Hair tests are also efficient when used to draw comparative test results, to find out when a drug was used, how long it was used for, or to determine if drug use was discontinued. However, it is not good if the tester only wants short-term results. It also has a longer turnaround time and is more expensive.

Factors That Determine How Long Drugs Stay In Your System

  • Type of drug(s) used
  • Amount of drug(s) used
  • Frequency of use
  • Hydration levels
  • Body mass
  • Physical activity
  • Drug tolerance
  • Metabolic rate
  • Medical conditions that impact drug elimination
  • The presence of other drugs or alcohol
  • Ethnicity
  • Gender
  • Weight
  • The drug’s half life

How Long Does Marijuana Stay In Your System?

Over 22 million Americans reported using Marijuana in the past month, making it the most commonly used illicit drug. In many states it has been legalized for recreational and medicinal use, and many others have only legalized medical Marijuana. However, there are still states across the country where Marijuana is illegal, and employers or court systems may need to conduct a drug test.

Tests for Marijuana are actually testing for the chemical tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) that makes people feel high. The results of a drug test depend on many factors, including how much body fat a person has, how often someone smokes, and how much they smoke. First-time Marijuana users are more likely to pass a drug test, compared to a person who smokes Marijuana multiple times per week. The timeframe for detection depends on the drug test:

Marijuana
Urine test Up to 30 days
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 4 hours
Saliva test Up to 72 hours

Marijuana use has multiple long-term effects that impact a person’s health and life. Studies show that Marijuana abuse can cause permanent IQ loss when individuals start using it at a young age, and it increases the likelihood of an individual having relationship problems, worse educational outcomes, and reduced life satisfaction. However, there are resources available for those looking for more information on Marijuana withdrawal and detox, signs of addiction, and treatment for Marijuana abuse.

How Long Does Synthetic Marijuana Stay In Your System?

Synthetic Marijuana, also known as K2 or Spice, are man-made chemicals that are sprayed on dried plants to be smoked or sold as liquids to be vaporized. This drug is sometimes marketed as “fake weed,” and it is unpredictable and dangerous, sometimes causing violent behavior, vomiting, suicidal thoughts, and rapid heart rate. The results of drug tests for Synthetic Marijuana greatly depend on how frequently the user inhales the drug.

Synthetic Marijuana
Urine test Up to 72 hours
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 48 hours
Saliva test Up to 48 hours

Synthetic Marijuana may contain chemicals similar to those found in the Marijuana plant; however, it is difficult to determine what chemicals are in Synthetic Marijuana products or what one’s reaction to them will be. There are severe health effects of synthetic cannabinoids, including breathing problems, muscle damage, heart attack, and kidney failure. For information on treatment options for Synthetic Marijuana addiction, click here.

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How Long Do Opioid Drugs Stay In Your System?

Opioids are a class of drugs that include Fentanyl, Heroin, and pain relievers such as Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Codeine, and Morphine. The misuse of prescription Opioids and Heroin affected over 10 million Americans in 2019. A study found that 80% of employers are concerned about Opioid use and 30% have restrictions for Opioid use in place. Living in the midst of an Opioid epidemic may require employers or judges to test people for drugs. The timeframe for detection depends on the specific drug, the frequency and quantity of use, metabolism, and body fat.

Morphine
Urine test Up to 3 days
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 3 days
Saliva test Up to 3 days

Morphine, prescribed for severe, chronic pain, carries a high risk of abuse and addiction due to how quickly an individual can develop a tolerance to it. Morphine use can result in severe, possibly fatal, breathing problems, and high doses could result in an overdose. Signs of a Morphine overdose include slurred speech, decreased responsiveness, spasms, and fever. For more information on the warning signs of Morphine addiction, click here. Additional informational resources on Morphine withdrawal, detox, and rehab options are also available.

Codeine
Urine test Up to 3 days
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 24 hours
Saliva test Up to 4 days

Codeine, found in many prescription cough medicines and Painkillers, produces similar effects to other Opiates when taken in higher doses. When someone takes more Codeine than prescribed, the risk of overdose and side effects increases, including lower blood pressure, abnormal breathing (which can lead to respiratory arrest), kidney failure, and liver failure. More information on the risks of Codeine abuse, withdrawal symptoms, and treatment is available.

Fentanyl
Urine test Up to 3 days
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 2 days

The dangers of Fentanyl, a synthetic Opioid, cannot be overstated- 2 mg of illicit Fentanyl can be a lethal dose depending on a person’s body size, tolerance, and past usage. Fentanyl is highly addictive due to its potency, and even taking prescription Fentanyl as prescribed can lead to dependence, which is characterized by withdrawal symptoms when drug use stops. Fentanyl’s high potency increases the risk of overdose, and synthetic Opioids are now the most common drugs involved in drug overdose deaths in the US. For information on treatment for Opioid addiction, click here.

Heroin
Urine test Up to 3 days
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 6 hours
Saliva test Up to 1 hour

Heroin use has multiple short-term side effects, including clouded mental function, slowed heart function and breathing. In the long term, repeated Heroin use changes the physical structure and function of the brain, and studies have shown deterioration of the brain’s white matter due to Heroin use, which affects decision-making abilities. Withdrawal symptoms from Heroin can begin between 6 and 12 hours after an individual’s last dose, but detox provides a safe, medically-supervised space to manage withdrawal symptoms. Information on treatment and rehab options for Heroin abuse is available here.

Hydrocodone
Urine test Up to 4 days
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 24 hours
Saliva test Up to 36 hours

Like other Opiates, Hydrocodone presents a high risk of dependency, and it can impair one’s breathing, heart rate, and speech. Extensive use of Hydrocodone can lead to addiction, with some dangers of Hydrocodone addiction including severe mood swings, insomnia, liver disease, kidney disease, overdose, and even death. The warning signs for a Hydrocodone addiction can include neglecting responsibilities, lying about substance use, doctor shopping for additional refills, and experiencing withdrawal symptoms after the effects wear off. Hydrocodone addiction treatment and rehab information can be found here.

Methadone
Urine test Up to 12 days
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 24 hours
Saliva test Up to 10 days

Methadone is commonly prescribed to treat moderate to severe pain and Opiate addictions as it helps to curb and reduce cravings. While Methadone possesses properties that dampen the effects of other Opioids, there still is the possibility of developing a tolerance to the synthetic Opioid, and abuse can lead to severe mental impairment. As a powerful Opioid, Methadone use can cause an overdose, so it is essential to recognize the warning signs of Methadone abuse. Resources are available for more information on withdrawal symptoms, Methadone detox, and treatment options.

Oxycodone
Urine test Up to 4 days
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 24 hours
Saliva test Up to 4 days

Oxycodone, found in OxyContin, is among the most commonly abused prescription drugs in the US. Oxycodone has a high risk for addiction and dependence, and it depresses an individual’s respiration and lowers blood pressure, which can lead to seizures, comas, or cardiac arrest. Resources are available for those looking for information on warning signs of Oxycodone addiction, withdrawal symptoms, detox, and rehab options.

Propoxyphene
Urine test Up to 10 days
Hair test Up to 90 days

Propoxyphene is no longer available on the market because the substance triggered abnormal electrical activity in the nervous system, with brand name medications Darvon and Darvocet triggering heart disorders in some. Additional risks of taking Propoxyphene include cardiac arrest, irregular or abnormal heartbeat (arrhythmia), slow heart rate (bradycardia), and congestive heart failure. Propoxyphene still circulates on the street market, so the risk of abuse and addiction is still present.

Tramadol
Urine test Up to 72 hours
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 48 hours
Saliva test Up to 48 hours

Tramadol has a boxed warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which alerts doctors and patients about potentially dangerous drug effects. Warnings for Tramadol include the risk of addiction and abuse, slowed or stopped breathing, life-threatening effects for children, and potential fatality when used with certain medications. Resources are available for those looking for more information on the warning signs of Tramadol addiction, withdrawal symptoms, detox, and treatment options.

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How Long Do Benzodiazepine Drugs Stay In Your System?

Benzodiazepines are sedatives that are commonly prescribed for anxiety or insomnia. The number of adults misusing these drugs is increasing, with the largest group of people misusing being ages 50 to 64. Common Benzodiazepines include Valium, Xanax, and Klonopin. Benzodiazepines usually stay in your system for 2 to 7 days if being detected by a urine test but can be detected for longer if the use is repeated.

Ativan
Urine test Up to 6 days
Hair test Up to 30 days
Blood test Up to 3 days
Saliva test Up to 8 hours

Ativan, often prescribed to treat anxiety and seizure activity, can induce feelings of confusion, depression, and elicit memory loss. Long-term effects of Ativan use include cognitive impairment and the development of a tolerance. Contact a treatment provider here to learn more information on treatment options for Ativan abuse. Additional information on the warning signs of Ativan abuse, withdrawal symptoms, and detox is available.

Librium
Urine test Up to 6 weeks
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 48 hours
Saliva test Up to 10 days

The misuse of Librium, often used to treat anxiety and manage acute alcohol withdrawal, can lead to dependence and overdose. Severe, although uncommon, side effects of Librium include severe drowsiness, fever, jaundice, memory loss, and thoughts of suicide. Additionally, the withdrawal symptoms from Librium can be uncomfortable, but it is never advised to detox from any drug without medical supervision. For more information on treatment and rehab options for Librium abuse, click here.

Valium
Urine test Up to 6 weeks
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 48 hours
Saliva test Up to 10 days

The serious, lasting effects of Valium abuse can include memory loss, hallucinations, difficulty breathing, coma, and potential heart attacks. Valium abuse can also lead to social isolation, job loss, and financial difficulties, so it is imperative to seek treatment. Treating an addiction to Valium is a process of managing withdrawal symptoms and behaviors resulting from or underlying the addiction.

Restoril
Urine test Up to 6 weeks
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 24 hours
Saliva test Up to 24 hours

The use of Restoril with Opioids may result in serious sedation, respiratory depression, and coma. More so, overdoses that occur from Benzodiazepines can slow breathing and heart rate until they stop entirely, which can result in death. For information on treatment options for Restoril abuse, contact a treatment provider today.

Xanax
Urine test Up to 4 days
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 24 hours
Saliva test Up to 2 days

Despite being one of the most prescribed psychiatric drugs in the US, Xanax is highly potent and potentially addictive. There are multiple dangerous health effects of Xanax abuse, including delirium, slurred speech, seizures during withdrawal, vertigo, and cognitive impairment. For those looking for more information on treatment for Xanax addiction, there are resources available.

How Long Do Hallucinogens Stay In Your System?

Hallucinogens are drugs that alter someone’s awareness and can cause people to see and hear things that aren’t there. They are split into 2 categories: Dissociative drugs, like PCP, and classic Hallucinogens, like LSD. Some Hallucinogens, like PCP and Ketamine, are man-made chemicals while others such as Psilocybin (commonly called magic mushrooms) are grown as plants and then consumed. Most of these drugs will be out of your system in a few days, but similar to other drugs, they can be found in hair follicles up to 90 days after use.

Ketamine
Urine test Up to 11 days
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 4 days

Ketamine produces a short-term high; however, tolerance to the substance builds quickly, which requires an individual to keep using increasing amounts to reach the same experience. Signs of Ketamine abuse include slurred speech, depression, insomnia, irritability, and impaired cognitive function. If an individual ceases the use of Ketamine abruptly, they may experience withdrawal symptoms, including fatigue, confusion, shakes, a decrease in respiratory and cardiac functions, and loss of motor skills. For information on rehab and treatment options for Ketamine abuse, click here.

LSD (Acid)
Urine test Up to 4 days
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 12 hours

LSD can produce long-term effects with repeated use, and the risk of experiencing these effects is higher for those who ingest large doses of the drug or have a preexisting mental health condition. One particular danger of LSD use is the potential to develop hallucinogen persisting perception disorder (or flashback), which are recurrences of the effects of LSD days or months after taking the last dose. Individuals can develop both a tolerance and a psychological dependence to LSD; once tolerance develops, substance abuse treatment may be necessary.

Mescaline
Urine test Up to 3 days
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 24 hours
Saliva test Up to 10 days

Mescaline, a Hallucinogenic chemical present in the Peyote cactus, causes visual and auditory hallucinations, with the intensity varying from person to person. With repeated use, psychological dependence can develop, which is when an individual begins to feel cravings for the substance. Even though Mescaline is not addictive, long-term abuse can adversely impact one’s life; long-term abuse may also increase the risk of one experimenting with other drugs, which carry more significant risks for addiction and overdose.

PCP
Urine test Up to 4 weeks
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 24 hours
Saliva test Up to 10 days

PCP use alters one’s state of consciousness and affects one’s memory, ability to process emotion, and learning ability. Higher doses of PCP can cause hallucinations and symptoms like anxiety, delusions, paranoia, and suicidal thoughts in some cases. Long-term use of PCP can lead to mental and physical cravings for the drug and the development of tolerance. However, multiple rehab options are available for those considering treatment for PCP abuse.

Psilocybin (Magic Mushrooms)
Urine test Up to 24 hours
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 24 hours

One of the most commonly reported adverse effects of Psilocybin use is psychological distress or a “bad trip,” which includes symptoms such as nausea, chills, vomiting, paranoia, anxiety, and hallucinations that can last for days. While it’s debated whether Psilocybin is addictive, repeated use can increase the risk of an individual developing a psychological dependence. However, continuing the use of Magic Mushrooms even after it’s resulted in negative consequences and side effects may be a sign of addiction.

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How Long Do Stimulant Drugs Stay In Your System?

Sixteen million American adults are prescribed Stimulants that are meant to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. Unfortunately, some people misuse prescription medications or use illicit drugs such as Cocaine or Methamphetamine. Ecstasy, also called MDMA or Molly, is chemically similar to both Stimulants and Hallucinogens.

Ecstasy
Urine test Up to 4 days
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 2 days
Saliva test Up to 2 days

One particular danger of Ecstasy use is that often substances purchased on the street are laced with other drugs like Methamphetamine, Ketamine, Heroin, and Cocaine to increase profits. Regular Ecstasy misuse can produce multiple side effects, including sleep disturbances, lack of appetite, concentration difficulties, depression, and a high risk of heart disease. Those who have developed a tolerance to Ecstasy may experience withdrawal symptoms if they abruptly stop use. Ecstasy withdrawal symptoms could include cravings, agitation, insomnia, paranoia, and fatigue. For more information on treatment options for Ecstasy abuse, contact a treatment provider here.

Cocaine
Urine test Up to 3 days
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 24 hours
Saliva test Up to 2 days

Once an individual tries Cocaine, a powerfully addictive Stimulant, they may have difficulty predicting or controlling the extent to which they will continue to use the drug. Potential medical risks of Cocaine abuse include heart attacks, respiratory failure, strokes, and seizures. Another specific danger of Cocaine use is that street dealers may mix the substance with other drugs like Amphetamines or Fentanyl to increase profits. There are resources available for those looking for more information on Cocaine withdrawal, detoxand treatment options.

Meth
Urine test Up to 1 week
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 3 days
Saliva test Up to 4 days

 

Meth use changes how the brain works and increases blood pressure and heart and respiratory rates to dangerous and potentially lethal levels. Those who repeatedly use Meth may experience long-term side effects, including permanent damage to the heart, increased risk of heart attacks, hallucinations, severe dental problems, and liver, kidney, and lung damage. Additionally, those who abuse Meth will likely experience intense withdrawal symptoms when they quit using the substance. For those looking for information on treatment and rehab options for Meth addiction, resources can be found here.

Adderall
Urine test Up to 72 hours
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 46 hours
Saliva test Up to 50 hours

Although Adderall is widely used to treat ADHD, it is still a potent Stimulant that can lead to severe and potentially fatal side effects if abused. Side effects of Adderall misuse include loss of appetite, racing heart, high blood pressure, aggressive behavior, blurred vision, and seizures. Additionally, taking Adderall for any reason other than why it was prescribed, or taking more than the specified amount, can lead to addiction. For information on withdrawal and detox from Adderall, click here. Contact a treatment provider today for information on treatment options.

Vyvanse
Urine test Up to 4 days
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 8 hours
Saliva test Up to 48 hours

Vyvanse, often prescribed to treat ADHD and binge-eating disorders, poses a high risk of addiction when misused, and excessive dosages over a long period can cause nerve damage. One may be abusing Vyvanse if they begin exhibiting symptoms like decreased appetite, worsened anxiety or panic attacks, mood changes, and a signific change in personality. However, many treatment options are available for those with an addiction to Vyvanse or other Stimulants.

Ritalin
Urine test Up to 2 days
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 12 hours
Saliva test Up to 2 days

While Ritalin can improve symptoms of ADHD, if misused, this stimulant can cause feelings of hostility and paranoia. High doses of Ritalin may also cause side effects like mood changes, confusion, hallucinations, and seizures. If an individual abruptly stops using Ritalin, one may experience withdrawal symptoms, so it is advised to taper off use slowly and under a medical professional’s care. For information on treatment and rehab options for Stimulant abuse, contact a treatment provider today.

How Long Do Barbiturate Drugs Stay In Your System?

Barbiturates are drugs mainly used to treat insomnia and seizure disorders. They are not as commonly prescribed as they used to be because of better alternatives available today. However, the number of people abusing Barbiturates is on the rise, giving the user a high that makes them feel drowsy and intoxicated. Common barbiturates include Amytal (Amobarbital), Luminal (Phenobarbital), Butisol (Butabarbital), Mebaral, Seconal, and Nembutal (Pentobarbital).There are several factors that determine how long Barbiturates will stay in your system. First is if the drug is short acting or intermediate acting. Second is how much and how often the drug is taken, and third is the individual’s body weight, hydration levels, metabolism, food intake, and sex.

Barbiturates
Urine test Up to 6 weeks
Hair test Up to 90 days
Blood test Up to 72 hours
Saliva test Up to 3 days

Barbiturates, also known as “downers,” pose a high risk for abuse due to their psychoactive effects. Because Barbiturates are habit-forming, individuals can build a tolerance and dependence to the substance, and if use is abruptly stopped, withdrawal symptoms may occur. Contact a treatment provider here to learn more information on treatment options for Barbiturate abuse.

Drug Tests For Alcohol

Alcohol is a central nervous system Depressant, and although it is legal for people over 21 in America, it is commonly abused and causes approximately 95,000 deaths each year. Most standard drug tests do not include alcohol, but there are tests to confirm alcohol abstinence if need be.

Alcohol
Urine test Up to 48 hours
Hair test Up to 90 days
Saliva test Up to 3 days

Due to the societal acceptance of alcohol use, it may be challenging to recognize the warning signs when one’s drinking habits have crossed over to problematic use. Over time, chronic alcohol use can decrease one’s immune system and increase the risk of chronic diseases and other serious problems, including high blood pressure, heart disease, liver disease, alcohol dependence, and stroke. Attending treatment for an alcohol use disorder (AUD) can lower the risk for serious health outcomes. For more information on alcohol withdrawal and detox, click here.

When Should You Seek Help For Addiction?

Although some substances are legal to use in some states, legalities do not absolve the risk of addiction. Even if an individual is using any substance in “moderation,” there are short- and long-term consequences of drug use depending on the substance used. In the short term, drug use can lead to impaired judgment and coordination, respiratory problems, increased heart rate and blood pressure, paranoia, and increased risk of heart attacks or strokes. Long-term dangers of drug use can include:

  • Damage to organs and systems in the body, including the throat, stomach, lungs, liver, heart, brain, and the nervous system
  • Increased risk of cancer (such as lung cancer from inhaling drugs)
  • Increased risk of infectious diseases from shared injecting equipment
  • Psychosis (losing touch with reality)
  • Higher risk of mental illness, depression, suicide, and death

While it’s important to know the risks of drug use, it’s also essential to know when treatment is necessary. When drug use begins to interfere with one’s routine, responsibilities, relationships, and overall wellbeing, it may be time for treatment. Depending on the substance used and the severity of substance abuse, an individual may need to detox before treatment. Detox is beneficial in substance abuse treatment because it helps individuals safely and comfortably come off of substances and manage withdrawal symptoms. Symptoms of withdrawal can be dangerous and potentially life-threatening, so it is never advised to cease substance abuse without medical assistance.

Treatment Helps Ensure Drugs Stay Out of Your System

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If someone you know is unable to stop misusing drugs or consuming alcohol to pass a drug test, they may have a serious substance use disorder. Contact a treatment provider to get more information on treatment options.

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Hayley Hudson

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  • Hayley Hudson is the Director of Content at Addiction Center. She earned a B.A. in Communications from the University of Central Florida and has 6 years of professional writing experience. A passion for writing led her to a career in journalism, and she worked as a news reporter for 3 years, focusing on stories in the healthcare and wellness industry. Knowledge in healthcare led to an interest in drug and alcohol abuse, and she realized how many people are touched by addiction.

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Reviewed by Certified Addiction Professional:

Theresa Parisi

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  • Theresa Parisi is a Certified Addiction Professional (CAP), Certified Behavioral Health Case Manager (CBHCM), and International Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (ICADC) with over 12 years of experience in the addiction treatment field.

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Dr. Ashish Bhatt, MD

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  • Addiction Center’s Medical Content Director, Dr. Ashish Bhatt, MD, MRO is an accomplished physician, addiction medicine specialist, and psychiatrist with over 20 years of medical and administrative leadership.

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