Alcoholics Anonymous

For nearly 80 years, the community of Alcoholics Anonymous has provided much-needed support and healing for recovering alcoholics.

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Huntington Creek Recovery Center

Shickshinny, PA

Multiple Levels of Care

844-892-1288

Bedrock Recovery Center

Canton, MA

Multiple Levels of Care

877-401-1084

Northeast Addiction Treatment Center

Quincy, MA

Multiple Levels of Care

855-831-4406

Northbound Treatment Services

Irvine, CA

Full Spectrum of Care

877-918-9085

Northlake Behavioral Health System

Baton Rouge, LA

Full Spectrum of Care

855-402-5289

Colorado Medicated Assisted Recovery

Thornton, CO

Intensive Outpatient

877-757-0618

Asheville Recovery Center

Asheville, NC

Multiple Levels of Care

877-542-1138

Wish Recovery

Northridge, CA

Multiple Levels of Care

855-933-2789

AION Recovery

Lantana, FL

Multiple Levels of Care

844-222-8954

Lakeview Behavioral Health Hospital

Norcross, GA

Multiple Levels of Care

855-337-9509

Steps Recovery Center

Payson, UT

Full Spectrum of Care

877-696-0054

TruVida Recovery

Lake Forest, CA

Full Spectrum of Care

888-717-0038

Sierra Tucson

Tucson, AZ

Full Spectrum of Care

855-889-6553

White Deer Run

Allenwood, PA

Multiple Levels of Care

877-638-3697

Keystone Treatment Center

Canton, SD

Multiple Levels of Care

855-417-3666

CNV Detox

Los Angeles, CA

Full Spectrum of Care

310-592-0139

Steps Recovery Center – St. George

St. George, UT

Full Spectrum of Care

844-919-0017

MeadowWood Behavioral Health

New Castle, DE

Multiple Levels of Care

855-609-4051

The Haven Detox

West Palm Beach, FL

Multiple Levels of Care

855-409-5866

Boca Recovery Center – Florida

Boca Raton, FL

Full Spectrum of Care

888-608-4977

Greenleaf Behavioral Health Hospital

Valdosta, GA

Multiple Levels of Care

866-692-1694

Indiana Center for Recovery

Bloomington, IN

Full Spectrum of Care

866-657-4490

Pocono Mountain Recovery Center

Henryville, PA

Multiple Levels of Care

844-589-1547

Clear Life Recovery

Costa Mesa, CA

Full Spectrum of Care

888-638-7182

Cove Forge Behavioral Health Center

Williamsburg, PA

Multiple Levels of Care

844-225-6578

Boca Recovery Center – New Jersey

Galloway, NJ

Full Spectrum of Care

855-628-9076

Silver Lining Recovery

Huntington Beach, CA

Multiple Levels of Care

844-940-0031

The Recovery Team

Lake Park, FL

Multiple Levels of Care

844-999-2545

Azure Acres Recovery

Sebastopol, CA

Multiple Levels of Care

877-872-7360

Southeast Addiction Center

Atlanta, GA

Multiple Levels of Care

855-614-6174

Alcoholics Anonymous from the Beginning

Founded by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith (both recovering alcoholics) in 1935, Alcoholics Anonymous began as a community-based fellowship to encourage sobriety for other recovering alcoholics. The pair developed the 12 steps to govern AA meetings, and later introduced the 12 traditions to help further define the group’s purpose.

Today, Alcoholics Anonymous boasts more than 2 million active members worldwide, with more than 50,000 groups nationwide. The original steps are still in tact and many former addicts credit the group with helping them through recovery. Conversely, other groups took inspiration from the 12-Steps and incorporated them into the theme of their group. Groups like Narcotics Anonymous or religious-based 12-Step groups have similar themes like personal accountability, but are slightly different in their representation of the divine. Despite this, this reveals the impact AA has had in the world of recovery.

What to Expect from an AA Meeting

Making the decision to go to an AA meeting can be intimidating and extremely uncomfortable, especially for someone who has no idea what to expect. It involves going outside of your comfort zone, admitting to a room full of strangers you have a problem and need help getting better.

Fortunately, every AA participant knows exactly how you feel. The organization itself was founded by recovering alcoholics and that model has held true through today. Every person involved in AA has been through it before, cultivating a unique feeling of community and understanding among the recovering addicts.

Attendees of an AA meeting will be welcomed into the group. Discussion among new attendees is encouraged but not required. In this circumstance, individuals ma need to be vulnerable about how their addiction has impacted their loved ones. Attendees may share stories and include commentary surrounding their journey of sobriety. There may be others who interject and support or share their story, or provide advice for others’ knowledge. Individuals can make friends and gain new perspectives. AA understands some people may not feel comfortable sharing intimate details during their first visit. As time goes on, most people find great healing and therapy through the open and honest discussions these meetings provide.

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“Closed” vs. “Open” Meetings

In a closed AA meeting, the only people who may attend are those who are recovering addicts (or those interested in learning more about overcoming their addiction). Open meetings allow the attendance of friends, spouses and family members. This is beneficial for those who wish to remain connected to friend and family members and feel family members support creates feelings of safety. Closed meetings could protect privacy, allowing limited or no outside involvement. Whether you decide to go to a closed or open meeting depends exclusively on what you’re comfortable with. Some people would rather keep their recovery separate from the rest of their life, hence closed meetings. Others thrive on the support that loved ones can provide during meetings, hence open meetings.

The 12 Steps

Now the standard for nearly all addiction recovery groups, the 12 Steps originated in Alcoholics Anonymous. The steps are presented in linear fashion, but participants see them as an ongoing circle. Steps may be revisited until the recovering addict is comfortable in that stage of their recovery process.

The first step requires admitting you have a problem, and need help in overcoming it. Subsequent steps include making a decision to quit; admitting to yourself and others your wrongs; making amends for wrongdoings; the willingness to turn one’s life over to God; making a fearless moral inventory of one’s self; and a commitment to continuous improvement. Because of the popularity of the 12 Steps, other groups began to surface–Narcotics Anonymous, Gamblers Anonymous and several other variations, each representing 12 Steps or a different version of it. Additionally, 12 Step programs allow for self reflection and growth in order to change for the better.

Read more about the 12 steps here.

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Oppositions to AA

There are some who do not believe in the transformative knowledge of AA meetings. Because of the discomfort associated with attending an AA meeting, many people will come up with reasons not to attend. Sometimes, this is due to embarrassment or what others will think, self-judgement, or one’s pride. In other cases, self-doubt or a lack of belief in the recovery process can hinder someone from attending a meeting, and as a result, someone can create excuses or hold an oppositional reason to avoid attendance. Some of the common oppositions people have are:

  • They don’t think it will help.
  • They’re afraid of seeing someone they know.
  • They aren’t sure they have a problem.
  • Some may not be religious.

Although these excuses may seem huge to people who are already nervous about attending a meeting, the real object to focus on is why you were considering going in the first place. Allowing excuses to keep you from growing or improving your relationships can prove to be an obstacle to wellness. Remembering why you’re there may help put things in perspective. Seeing the bigger picture versus allowing excuses or an ego to stop you from getting treatment can be something to look at.

Bottom line: If you think there’s a problem, you’re probably right. There’s no harm in going to a meeting if it means potentially saving you from years of heartache caused by your addiction. Setting aside denial and succumbing to admittance is a powerful course of action.

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Finding an Alcoholics Anonymous Group

Regardless of where you live, there is bound to be an AA group nearby. Most groups meet regularly, so you can go sooner rather than later. Decide whether you want to do a closed or open meeting and in what area, and you can find one online through our meeting finder. To find an AA group near you, contact a dedicated treatment provider today.

 

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